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Sustainability In The Home: Bamboo

By  Mavis  Zhou   |  18th November 2020

Bamboo is inherently beautiful, versatile and robust. In various design sectors around the world, it is favoured for its natural applications and sustainability. A durable material, it also has a softer side and can be transformed into fabrics or textiles.

Many things make bamboo a fascinating material:

– Although bamboo may strike you as a type of wood, it is actually a type of grass.

– Bamboo grows extremely fast, with some species able to grow up to 3ft a day.

– As if by magic, they regrow on their own after harvesting, meaning they don’t need to be replanted.

– It can take as little as 3 years to reach maturity, compared to timber which often takes 25.

– Bamboo has a greater tensile rating than steel, meaning it is incredibly difficult to pull apart.

With that in mind, it’s no wonder why bamboo has been dubbed the green steel of the world. To this day it is used to build the concrete giants that tower over Hong Kong. It has been the choice for traditional structures around Asia for many years. Most famously, bamboo groves have been used to encircle Japanese temples to ward off evil spirits. While in China, bamboo stages are used as platforms for performing classical Chinese Opera.

In the world of architectural trends, there are now two forces at play. On one end of the spectrum, people are looking to technological advances like 3D printing homes and creating new metals to revolution how we build our homes. On the other hand, there are those who value natural elements. Some would say these materials, like bamboo already surpass man-made creations, and do so without polluting whilst also creating a charming aesthetic.

An Eco-Friendly Approach to Interior Design and Architecture

As efforts to become more environmentally friendly and sustainable grip the world of design, bamboo has become a focus. Most notably, it has a way of capturing carbon, reducing the world’s output whilst also producing 35% more oxygen than most trees. In a time where deforestation is a significant concern, bamboo is key to the future of the planet as it regenerates so quickly. From an economic standpoint, developing nations within Asia can quickly grow bamboo, creating a healthy ecosystem for jobs and trade.

7 Ways To Bring Bamboo Into The Home

Bamboo naturally has eastern sensibilities tide to it, in China, it is a symbol of great nobility. It lends itself well to both Asian-style and tropical decor with its many forms. Beyond building from scratch with bamboo, here’s how you can achieve that zen-like quality with bamboo accents.

Windows

Think of bamboo roll-up blinds or Roman shades, a gentle way to dim the lights and keep some privacy within your space. These work well in both indoor and outdoor spaces.

Basket

Rustic and charming, a carved or woven bamboo basket can be both practical and ornamental. They naturally work well with plants, can be used to house a blanket for the sofa or keep ingredients handy when cooking.

Rug

Bamboo rugs do an excellent job of softening an interior, and they aren’t just limited to beige woven carpets. Nowadays there are a variety of patterned and colours designed to accent your sofa, entrance or dining table.

Lounge Chairs

As sturdy as they come, bamboo seating lends itself equally well to living rooms, balconies and gardens. Bamboo chairs exude a laid back charisma and old-world glamour.

Bowls

Bamboo bowls have almost become a modern-day essential, ideal for displaying fruits or, more elaborate carved pieces as a standalone decoration atop a shelf.

Mirrors

Whether minimal or intricate, a bamboo mirror invites more light into the home. A more rustic pattern can make a home feel a little more exotic, whereas a refined, simple design can make the room feel more upscale.

Partition

A savvy way to break up a room without blocking off the line of sight entirely, a bamboo partition is gentle on the eyes. It feels as though you have invited nature indoors. A practical way to divide a space without losing any natural light.

Images via Pinterest

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